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The Hayward Fault

The Hayward Fault, running right through the UC Berkeley campus, has a 31% probability of rupturing in a magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquake within the next 30 years. (Source: UCERF 2008 report) Learn more about the Hayward Fault through these videos, presentations, and links.

The Hayward Fault Presentation

The science behind earthquakes, from seismic waves to stress relief, ending with a dramatic east-bay earthquake scenario that is all too likely to happen.


Click on each slide to move forward.

Download powerpoint presentation
View and download accompanying videos and animations

The Hayward Fault Presentation - 6th Grade

This presentation introduces plate tectonics, earthquakes, and our very own Hayward Fault. Geared toward the 6th grade.


Click on each slide to move forward.

Download powerpoint presentation.
Download teacher's guide (.doc).
View accompanying animation for slide 9 (From SCEC)
View and download another strike-slip fault animation.

 

Hayward Fault Videos

The Hayward Fault on the UC Berkeley Campus

UC Berkeley seismologist Dr. Peggy Hellweg leads a tour of the Hayward Fault's path through Memorial Stadium.



Download in Quicktime (.mov) format

Doug Dreger Explains the USGS Hayward Fault Simulation

UC Berkeley seismologist Dr. Doug Dreger explains the USGS Hayward Fault M7.0 earthquake simulation.



Download in Quicktime (.mov) format

The USGS Hayward Fault Simulation

The USGS Hayward Fault M7.0 earthquake simulation. (Click here to view more USGS Hayward Fault earthquake simulations.)



Download in Quicktime (.mov) format

BSL/LLNL Hayward Fault Simulation

A Hayward Fault simulation animation by Dr. Shawn Larsen of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Dr. Doug Dreger of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory.



Download in .AVI format (Quicktime compatible)

Hayward Fault Links

Bay Bridge shaking scenario animation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (.mov format, for Quicktime). View more LLNL quake simulations.