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Geophysical Networks

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The Berkeley Seismological Laboratory has a long history in seismic monitoring in northern and central California. Today, the BSL operates several different networks and has expanded into a broader range of geophysical monitoring. We have even ventured into the oceans!

Deployment of the obs from an MBARI ship


Map of BSL monitoring sites

We have put together a small collection of photographs from BDSN, HFN, and BARD sites.

All data collected by the BSL are archived at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center.

Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN)

3 STS1 seismometers

The BDSN is a sparse array, consisting of ~35 broadband, high-dynamic range stations. Each of the BDSN sites is equipped with a broadband seismometer, a strong-motion accelerometer, and a 24-bit digital datalogger. Most sites are also equipped with temperature and pressure sensors. Data from the stations are transmitted to UC Berkeley continuously, using dedicated digital telemetry. In order to avoid data loss during utility disruptions, each site has a 3-day supply of battery power and is also accessible via a dialup phone line.

The BDSN overview describes the network in greater detail, while the map illustrates the geographic distribution of the network. The station table provides a complete index of BDSN stations with additional information on station siting, instrumentation, and details about instrument responses.

HFN borehole seismometer put in place

Hayward Fault Network (HFN)

The Hayward Fault Network is an array of borehole instruments deployed along the Hayward Fault in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through an agreement with the USGS Menlo Park, the instruments along the northern section of the fault are operated by UC Berkeley, while instruments along the southern section are operated by the USGS Menlo Park. Each station is equipped with an accelerometer and a geophone with a 24-bit datalogger. The Northern HFN is considered part of the BDSN and uses the network code BK. The Southern HFN is considered part of the NCSN and uses the network code NC.

The Northern HFN overview describes the network in greater detail, while the map illustrates the geographic distribution of the network. The station table provides a complete index of Northern HFN stations with additional information on station siting, instrumentation, and details about instrument responses.

Parkfield High Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN)

Gastro Peak repeater site

The High Resolution Seismic Network is part of the Parkfield Prediction Experiment. Initially developed as a network for controlled source monitoring, it was recently upgraded and converted for earthquake monitoring. The HRSN is a network of borehole geophones, with 24-bit digital dataloggers and continuous telemetry to a central site in Parkfield. The central site facility performs event detection and ships triggered waveform data to the BSL for archive.

The HRSN overview describes the network in greater detail, while the map illustrates the geographic distribution of the network. The station table provides a complete index of HRSN stations with additional information on station siting, instrumentation, and details about instrument responses. Publications resulting from studies utilizing HRSN data are listed here.

Mini-Plate Boundary Observatory (MPBO)

USGS drill rig

The Integrated Instrumentation Program for Broadband Observations of Plate Boundary Deformation, commonly referred to as ``Mini-PBO'', is a multi-institutional project to form an integrated pilot system of instrumentation for the study of plate boundary deformation, with special emphasis on its relation to earthquakes.

The project has three components: 1) 8 sites with borehole tensor strainmeters and seismometers, downhole pore pressure and tilt sensors, and geodetic GPS receivers in San Francisco Bay Area; 2) the installation of 9 continuous GPS sites in the Parkfield area of central California; and 3) the support of the skeleton operations of a 5-m X-band SAR downlink facility in San Diego to collect and archive radar. The Mini-PBO overview describes the network in greater detail, while the map illustrates the geographic distribution of the network. A station table provides some general site and instrumentation details.

Electro-Magnetic Observatories

In collaboration with Professor Frank Morrison, the BSL Laboratory has established electromagnetic field observatories at 2 BDSN sites. Sites were initially established at SAO and PKD1. When the BDSN site at PKD1 was relocated to PKD, additional electromagnetic sensors were installed there. The PKD1 equipment was recorded in parallel with PKD for several months and then removed in early 1999.

The electro-magnetic observatories overview describes the experiments and their data in greater detail.

Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband Project (MOBB)

The BSL has collaborated with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in two experiments on ocean-bottom instrumentation: the Monterey Bay Ocean Bottom International Seismic Experiment (MOISE) and Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband (MOBB) Project.

GPS antenna at Sutter Butte

The MOISE and MOBB deployments are multi-purpose experiments to develop, install, and operate a seafloor observatory. The MOISE experiment was conducted from 6/10/1997 - 9/10/1997 and all equipment was successfully recovered. The MOBB deployment began on 4/12/2002 and is planned as a permanent installation. The overview describes the seafloor observatory in greater detail, with a map of the MOISE and MOBB locations.

Tremorscope

The Berkeley Seismological Laboratory at the University of California Berkeley has receieved Moore F oundation support to develop a unique network of seismic instruments to study the recently discovere d tremor activity in the deep roots of the San Andreas fault at Cholame, California. Funding is bein g used to build, collect and analyse data from this wide- aperture, low-noise, broad-band TremorScop e network. This will improve our understanding of the nature of the tremor signals and its implicati ons for fault mechanics and earthquake hazard. All data resulting from these efforts will be publicl y available within a short time of their being collected.

Tremorscope project page

Bay Area Regional Deformation Network (BARD)

The BARD Network consists of 48 continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations in northern and central California, with special emphasis on monitoring deformation near Parkfield, the Long Valley cauldera, and in the San Francisco Bay area. The primary goal of the network is to monitor crustal deformation across the Pacific-North America plate boundary and in the San Francisco Bay Area for earthquake hazard reduction studies and rapid earthquake emergency response assessment.

The BARD overview describes the network and access to data, while the map shows the distribution of stations. The station table provides an index of BARD stations.