MICHAEL MANGA

Neat stuff in the field


Little Glass Mountain, CA (photo by Helge Gonnermann)

Although field work is not the central component of our research it is still a key aspect of our work and classes, and has provided the inspiration for new projects and research directions. In fact, several completed student theses have been based on field work or data collected in the field. These theses include the MSc theses of Bretagne Hygelund (geomorphology), Liz James (isotope hydrogeology), Martin Saar (porosity-permeability relationships in basalts), the PhD thesis of Jon Castro (obsidian flow dynamics), and Maria Brumm (heat flow in the Sierras). Max Rudolph studied mud volcanoes and Leif Karlstrom studied supraglacial channels. With Joel Rowland we monitor springs in the Bay Area in order to document and understand hydrological responses to earthquakes.


Bands in obsidian at Little Glass Mountain, CA (photo by Helge Gonnermann)

Click on the links below for photos and more details

Kagoshima, Japan, July 2013

Hawaii, August 2012

Christchurch, New Zealand, May 2012

IODP Expedition 340, March-April 2012

Mono and Inyo domes, eastern California, August 2011

Homoman peridotite, Mt Usu, Mt Tarumae, Japan, July 2011

Salton Sea mud volcanoes and mud pots, spring 2010

Lassen volcano, 2009

Australia (the red interior, rainforest and Great Barrier Reef), 2009

Kilauea, Hawaii, 2009

Alpine Fault, New Zealand, 2009

Mount St Helens, 2008

Iceland, 2008

Grand Canyon, 2007

Mound springs, New Mexico, 2006

The Outback, Australia, 2006

Antarctica, January 2005

Medicine Lake, August 2002

Springs near Mission Peak, CA

Springs in the Oregon Cascades

Sespe Creek watershed



Michael at Fall River, Oregon, a spring-fed river


Return to Michael's home page